Cape Cod Real Estate, Marie Souza


Looking to list your house and maximize its value? Ultimately, a home selling timeline can make a world of difference, regardless of where your house is located.

A home selling timeline enables you to map out the home selling journey. Then, you can decide the best steps to ensure you can achieve your home selling goals as quickly as possible.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you craft an effective home selling timeline.

1. Set a Deadline

When do you want to be out of your current house and living elsewhere? Establish a home selling deadline, and you can determine how much time you have to navigate the home selling journey.

If you need to sell your home in a matter of weeks, you'll likely need to move quickly if you want to achieve the best-possible results. Thus, you'll need to make a plan to ensure you can promote your house to the right buyers and speed up the home selling process.

Conversely, if you have several months to sell your house, you may be able to take a gradual approach to listing and promoting your residence. In this scenario, it may be worthwhile to conduct a home inspection, identify any underlying home problems and address these issues. That way, you can perform assorted house improvements to boost the value of your residence.

2. Determine Your Budget

A home selling timeline and budget often go hand-in-hand, and for good reason. If you craft a home selling budget in conjunction with your timeline, you can ensure you have the necessary finances for expenses that may arise during the home selling journey.

For example, consider what may happen if a homebuyer identifies myriad home problems during an inspection. In this situation, a buyer may ask you to complete home improvements in order to move forward in the home selling process. And if you have already set aside funds for home improvements, you can complete these tasks and ensure you can stick to your home selling timeline.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

For home sellers, it generally helps to hire a real estate agent. This housing market professional can help you create a successful home selling timeline and address a wide range of home selling hurdles.

A real estate agent understands the complexities of selling a house and will make it easy for you to make informed decisions throughout the home selling journey. He or she will teach you about the housing market and ensure you can establish a competitive initial asking price for your residence. Next, a real estate agent will promote your house to prospective buyers and help you review offers on your residence. And once you receive a fair homebuying proposal, a real estate agent will ensure you can quickly and effortlessly finalize a home sale.

Set up a timeline for selling your house – you'll be glad you did. If you use the aforementioned tips, you can establish an effective home selling timeline that guarantees you can optimize the profits from your home sale.



91 Quashnet Road, Mashpee, MA 02649

Single-Family

$300,000
Price

4
Rooms
2
Beds
1
Baths
Move-in ready Ranch style home situated on a wooded .94 acre lot. Easy access to Mashpee Commons! This home has been freshly painted and has all new carpeting. There is a full basement with interior access as well as bulkhead access to the rear yard. This is a perfect starter home or vacation get-away! Passing Title V design is for a 3 bedroom. capacity.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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 Photo by rawpixel via Pixabay

A high-performance home is one that operates efficiently, and saves you -- the  homeowner -- significant costs in heating, cooling and more. When it comes time to sell a home of this type, the price point is typically higher -- up to 3.4 percent. High-performance homes are in demand today, and if you've made the necessary upgrades to your home, and are now ready to list it for sale, here's what you can expect in the way of appraisal, listing, showings, offers and sales. 

The Appraisal

Choose your appraiser wisely. The professional you choose should have experience appraising high-performance homes. Because there may not be comparable properties in the area from which to draw, it's important that the person who values your property has all the facts and a firm understanding of exactly how well your home performs. You can also challenge an appraisal if you feel it's too low or that the appraiser didn't take into account all the existing features of your home. 

The Listing

Again, comps -- or properties in the area that are comparable to your own -- are often a problem when it's a high-performance home on the selling block. While they're gaining popularity across the country, these types of homes are still relatively foreign in some areas. 

Don't let lack of comps cause your home's price point to plummet. Partner with your real estate agent to ensure they understand all the energy-efficient and green features of your property. These need to be highlighted in your home's listing, so prospective buyers can see and appreciate them. 

Showing Your High-Performance Home

When it's time for real estate agents to show your home, make sure they're talking up all the green features. You can do this by printing up flyers and having them available inside the home for buyers and their representatives to peruse. You should also make sure you have documentation and proof of all your upgrades on file and ready to produce if someone asks to see them. 

Fielding Offers

Hopefully, once your high-performance home hits the listings, and real estate agents begin bringing their buyers in to tour the property, you'll begin to receive offers. Fielding multiple offers is every home seller's dream, but don't become discouraged if it takes some time to find the right buyer. Even with all the bells and whistles your home has to offer, it's likely priced higher than other properties in the area. 

That's okay. Don't panic and take the first low offer that surfaces. In time, your high-performance home will find the family who appreciates it. 

A high-performance home is a valuable asset in today's world of steadily rising energy costs, but expect the selling process to be a bit more challenging than that of a more traditional home. 

 


Looking to add your home to the real estate market? Ultimately, you'll want to do everything you can to maximize the value of your residence.

For home sellers, getting the best price for a residence may seem virtually impossible at times. Fortunately, we're here to help you plan ahead so you can get the best price for your house as soon as it hits the market.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you optimize the value of your residence, regardless of the current real estate market's conditions.

1. Examine the Housing Market

When it comes to the real estate market, it is important to understand how your residence stacks up against the competition.

Collect housing market data to learn about the real estate sector. Then, you can establish a "competitive" price for your home and boost your chances of a quick home sale.

Typically, home sellers should look at the prices of currently available residences in their cities and towns. This will enable home sellers to understand the local real estate market and establish a price range for houses that are similar to their own.

Don't forget to review the prices of recently sold houses as well. With this housing market data in hand, home sellers can find out whether they are about to enter a seller's or buyer's market.

2. Complete a Home Appraisal

Let's face it – what your home is worth today is unlikely to match what you initially paid for your residence. If you have completed a wide range of home upgrades over the years, the value of your residence may have increased. Or, if you failed to maintain your house's interior and exterior, your residence's value may have fallen.

A home appraisal will enable you to learn about your house's strengths and weaknesses. This assessment is performed by a professional property inspector who will take a close look at your house's interior and exterior. After the assessment is finished, the property inspector will provide you with a report that can help you price your house appropriately.

If you want to boost your home's value after a home appraisal, you can always complete various home interior and exterior improvement projects. That way, you can enhance your house both inside and out and move closer to maximizing the value of your home.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a difference-maker for home sellers, and for good reason. This housing market professional will do everything possible to help you prep your house and ensure you can receive the best price for it – without exception.

Usually, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open houses, negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf and much more. He or she will even provide honest, unbiased home selling recommendations to ensure you can streamline the home selling journey.

Don't leave anything to chance as you get ready to add your house to the real estate market. Use these tips, and you should have no trouble getting the best price for your house.


Buying a home is a big financial endeavor that takes planning and saving. Aside from a down payment, hopeful homeowners will also need to save for closing costs and moving expenses.

When it comes to the down payment amount you’ll need to save, many of us have often heard 20%, the magic number. However, there are a number of different types of mortgages that have different down payment requirements.

To complicate matters, mortgages vary somewhat between lenders and can change over time, with the ebb and flow of the housing market.

So, the best way to approach the process of saving for a down payment is to think about your needs in a home, and reach out to lenders to start comparing rates.

However, there are a few constants when it comes to down payments that are worth considering when shopping for a mortgage.

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about some characteristics of down payments, discuss where the 20% number comes from, and give you some tips on finding the best mortgage for you.

Do I need 20% saved for a down payment?

With the median home prices in America sitting around $200,000 and many areas averaging much higher, it may seem like 20% is an unattainable savings goal.

The good news is that many Americans hoping to buy their first home have several options that don’t involve savings $40,000 or more.

So, where does that number come from?

Most mortgage lenders will want to be sure that lending to would be a smart investment. In other words, they want to know that they’ll earn back the amount they lend you plus interest. They determine how risky it is to lend to you by considering a number of factors.

First and foremost is your credit score. Lenders want to see that you’re paying your bills on time and aren’t overwhelmed by debt. Second, they will ask you for verification of your income to determine how much you can realistically hope to pay each month. And, finally, they’ll consider the amount you’re putting down.

If you have less than 20% of the mortgage amount saved for your down payment, you’ll have to pay for private mortgage insurance (PMI). This is an extra fee must be paid in addition to your interest each month.

First-time buyers rarely put 20% or more down

Thanks to FHA loans guaranteed by the federal government, as well as other loan assistance programs like USDA loans and mortgages insured by the Department of Veterans Affairs, buying a home is usually within reach even if you don’t have several thousands saved.

On average, first-time buyers put closer to 6% down on their mortgage. However, they will have to pay PMI until they’ve paid off 20% of their home.


So, if you’re hoping to buy a home in the near future, saving should be a priority. But, don’t worry too much if you don’t think you can save the full 20% in advance.




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